Archive for the ‘Puppies’ Category

Common Puppy Behavior Problems: Jumping Up

Gemma | February 27th, 2006
1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (5 votes, average: 4.20 out of 5)
Loading...Loading...
95 views

Nothing is more disconcerting than having a big dog jump up on you and practically knock you over. In fact, this habit is even more dangerous when children or elderly people are concerned. Far too many dog owners leave this bad habit alone and do not get concerned until it’s too late, and the pooch is like a full grown bear trying to tumble over everyone he greets.

Teaching your puppy not to jump on people is important. Even though your pup is small now, he’ll be bigger in no time. If he’s a large breed, he’ll be capable of knocking people over when he jumps up to greet them.

Small Dogs Are Not Off The Hook

Even small dogs can be a nuisance when jumping up so just because you own a toy breed do not think they should be off the hook. These small dogs can rip pantyhose, scratch legs and even knock over small children.

Instead of allowing your dog to jump on people, teach your dog to sit when he greets anyone including you and the other members of your family. First, teach him to sit. Once he knows this basic cue and performs it reliably, you can move on to training him not to jump up.

A Simple Anti-Jumping Training Routine

Start by setting up some training sessions. To train your puppy not to jump on company you’ll need your guests to help you. Before you allow your company in the house, put a leash on your puppy and then bring your guests inside. Tell them that they cannot pet or pay attention to your puppy until he sits in front of them first.

Tell your puppy sit as the company enters. If he doesn’t sit but instead tries to jump up on your visitors, hold him back with the leash and tell your guests to back away from him. They cannot pet him until he obediently sits and controls his impulse to jump up.

To teach your puppy not to jump on you, follow these steps: make sure your hands are free when you come in the house and your puppy tries to jump up on you, grasp him by the collar and tell him Off. Then tell him to sit as you continue to grasp his collar. Hold him in this position and then praise him for sitting.

Encourage everyone in your family to enforce this rule constantly to your puppy gets the message. Consistency is key when teaching a puppy not to jump up. Within a week of solid training your pooch should show signs of control from jumping on people.

Common Puppy Behavior Problems: Barking & Digging

Gemma | February 26th, 2006
1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (5 votes, average: 4.00 out of 5)
Loading...Loading...
164 views

Barking is completely normal for any dog but it should be considered a problem if it becomes excessive. Most dogs will bark at strangers passing by, and this is to be expected. However, you need to teach your puppy that although some barking is OK, too much barking is not.

Allow your puppy to bark two or three times when someone rings the doorbell, approaches your house or walks past your yard. Don’t let your puppy bark frantically until the person eventually leaves the area.

A Simple Anti-Barking Routine

To train your puppy not to bark excessively, be consistent and plan ahead. Ask a friend to come to your home and ring the doorbell. When the bell rings, your puppy probably will run toward the door and bark.

Take hold of your puppy’s collar at that moment, and say his name and then the cue be quiet. When he listens to you and ceases his barking, praise him heartily. After several practice sessions, your puppy should start to catch on.

Once your puppy has learned to respond reliably to the quiet cue while inside your house, you can begin the training session outdoors in your yard. Ask friends and neighbors to help you with the training by walking past your property or doing whatever else it is that sets your puppy off on a barking spree.

Remember, too, that bored dogs will bark more than those who are getting enough stimulation. If your puppy is barking like crazy at everyone who passes the house, he may need more exercise and stimulation. That way he won’t feel compelled to come up with his own distractions.

Digging

The instinct to dig is strong in most dogs and often starts in puppyhood. If your puppy is starting to dig up the yard, you need to intervene before your garden begins to look like a mine field.

The best way to control your puppy’s urge to dig is to give him a spot in the yard where he can dig to his heart’s content. This might be a place where you’ve already seen him digging if you don’t really mind that he digs there. Or, you may want to entice him to dig in an area that is out of the way and not visible from most parts of your yard.

If you catch him digging in a place that is not allowed, correct him by saying NO DIG! and take him to his allowed spot. If he digs in this designated digging area, praise him to let him know he’s got the right idea.

Even though he has his own digging spot, you may find that your puppy still likes to dig in places he shouldn’t. Protect these areas with temporary fencing (like chicken wire) until your puppy gets in the habit of digging only in his designated spot. Eventually, you should be able to take down the fencing and give him the run of the yard.

Rules To Follow When Bringing Home Your Child’s First Puppy

Gemma | December 19th, 2004
1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (1 votes, average: 4.00 out of 5)
Loading...Loading...
50 views

I can still remember the very first day that my Mom and Dad brought home a new puppy for my brothers and myself.

It was probably the most exciting day of my life and the very first time that I fell in love with my pet dog.

His name was Laddy and he became my very first best friend. That day happened almost 30 years ago.

Laddy is unfortunately not with us anymore, but the memory of my first puppy will live on forever.

Your Child’s First Puppy Memories

As you can tell, getting a dog was one of the fondest moments of my childhood and if you’re planning to offer the same joy and excitement for your child by giving him or her a new puppy, it will be a gift that you and your kids will never forget.

The day you present that adorable and loving pup to your children, the memory will be etched in their minds forever.

Teaching Your Children What To Expect When The Puppy Arrives

There is one word that can describe what it’s going to be like for your children as they are introduced to this sweet tiny puppy: Excitement!

All little boys and girls go absolutely crazy when they see a puppy somewhere out in town and since it is going to be their new puppy, you can guarantee this excitement to be magnified by 1000%

Your job is to ensure that your children can remain as calm as possible. Let them know that you understand how exciting it is when the new puppy gets home, but at the same time you must teach them that he is going to be extremely scared and nervous. A puppy will need some space so that he does not get overly frightened.

Teach your kids to avoid yelling and shouting. Let them know that all roughhousing and grabbing of the puppy is forbidden. In addition, declare an official rule that the siblings can not fight with each other in front of the puppy, ever.

The best way to go about this is to have a family meeting before you bring the dog home and make sure to go over all of the rules with your children. Have them repeat these rules until you’re confident that the kids can be trusted with the puppy so that he does not get harmed or frightened.

WebRep
currentVote
noRating
noWeight

Is It Possible To Adopt A Quality Puppy?

Gemma | January 25th, 2004
1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (2 votes, average: 3.50 out of 5)
Loading...Loading...
54 views

Is it possible to find a quality puppy to adopt at your local animal shelter or breed rescue group?

Conventional wisdom says no, but representatives of both enterprises say that’s not always the case. In fact, many puppies are given up and not adopted for a while. For example, one pup named Tiger was dropped off at a local San Diego shelter when he was just 12 weeks old and is still waiting to be adopted. He is 8 months old now.

You can find a lovely puppy at a shelter. Some of these puppies come from backyard breeders or from people who find themselves saddled with oops! litters when an unexpected litter of puppies results when a female dog is impregnated by accident.

Still, the availability of puppies at a shelter or breed rescue group may depend on what breed is involved. Rescue groups rarely get puppies, let alone purebred Gold Retriever puppies, for example. In another group located in New York, there have only been three litters of puppies of the nearly 800 dogs that have been placed.

In any case, breed rescue groups and animal shelters have identical missions: To match homeless dogs with people who will love them and give them permanent homes.

Shelters generally accommodate all breeds and mixes. Many are run by local governments. Some have a policy of euthanizing dogs who are not claimed or adopted after a certain period of time; others will keep adoptable dogs indefinitely.

Generally, all adoptable dogs that come to a shelter are given health examinations and any immunizations needed, and may be spayed or neutered. Many shelters also perform special tests to determine what type of temperament a dog has, and some offer training programs to help increase a dog’s chances of being adopted.

Breed rescue groups focus on serving one breed or mixes in which that single breed predominates. Volunteers for these groups identify dogs in need, take them into their own homes for foster care, attend to their medical needs, and provide remedial training to help the dogs become more adoptable.

Typically, adoptable dogs remain with rescue groups until a permanent home is found. Sometimes, that permanent home turns out to be that of the foster care provider.

Often, shelters and rescue groups work together on a dog’s behalf. For example, if a dog’s time is running out at an animal shelter, staff workers there might contact a rescue group and ask if that group can provide foster care for the dog. Such cooperation literally can be a lifesaver for a dog who needs a little more time to find a forever home.