Posts Tagged ‘tips’

6 Moving Tips To Keep Your Dog Happy – Part 2

Kate | July 27th, 2012
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Many dog owners fail to understand that moving to a new house and uprooting all of your belongings can be extremely stressful on their pets. It doesn’t matter if you’re just moving across town, or across the entire nation, it is important to make sure that your dog’s well-being and his safety are part of your moving plans. Below are a few tips to assist you in cushioning your canine companion’s anxiety during the move:

1. If your dog is the type that gets overly anxious and sick during car trips, check into holistic therapies. For example, there is a product called Bach’s Rescue Remedy that helps calm your pet down during times of stress. All you do is rub it on his ears and feet.

2. Just like it is wise to keep your dog in a quiet, closed off room in the old house on moving day, the same rule should apply in the new house when you and the rest of your family arrive. Pick one room and provide enough food and water so that your dog can sit quietly without noticing all of the confusion around the new house.

3. When you arrive at the new home, unpack your dog’s belongings as soon as you get there. Be sure to keep the boxes that contain his stuff close by. These items would include hi bedding, his food and water bowls, and dog toys. This will help your dog adjust as quickly as possible by having familiar items around him while adjusting to the strange house.

4. Moving creates many security issues for dogs and other pets alike. With unpacking all of the boxes and miscellaneous furniture items, there are dangers all around when the household items have not been set up yet. Electrical cords, small objects, pantyhose, plants, etc. all have a possibility of being left out when unpacked and into your dog’s mouth.

5. Check the new house for possible places that your dog may escape from. Loose screens, holes in fences, and half shut doors will enable your dog to roam free and risk getting injured or lost in the new territory.

6. Now that you have arrived in a new town, your first order of business as it pertains to your dog and other animals is to find a veterinarian. Finding a groomer is also a good idea. And should you have to leave your dog alone during trips or when at work, look into a pet sitter service that can help your dog adjust in the new home until he is ready to be alone.

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6 Moving Tips To Keep Your Dog Happy – Part 1

Kate | July 27th, 2012
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Moving your entire family into a new house can be a stressful change, not only for you and the rest of the family, but for your dog as well. Of all of the life changes that your pet can experience in his lifetime, moving can be the biggest.

Your dog’s temperament will have a big influence on how he reacts to all of the confusion, however, it is safe to say that regardless of what breed your dog is, there are some very useful tips that you can use to alleviate the stress. Below are a few:

1. If you have a small dog, be sure to have invested into a sturdy carrier that you can use to transport him to the new house on the day of the big move.

2. Because your dog feels a sense of security in his day-to-day routine, try your best to gradually make changes with your moving plans by packing boxes and storing household items weeks ahead of time. This is far better than waiting until the last minute and totally confusing your dog with the extreme upheaval of the entire household.

3. Dogs do escape so be sure to have an appropriate ID tag attached to his collar with the current address and phone information. He may become disoriented from the move and try to dart away.

4. If you have to travel a long distance to your new home and run the chance of making an overnight stay at motel, plan ahead of time for a pet-friendly establishment. This will save you a lot of stress trying to find a suitable hotel in the middle of the night.

5. Moving day means that your dog should not be around while everyone is making their last minute adjustments and packing finalities. During this time it is wise to tuck your dog into a room of his own with food and water and do not disturb him besides bathroom breaks of course. Keeping him in private and away from the confusion will prevent disorientation and stress.

6. If you happen to be flying to your new destination, it should go without saying that choosing a pet-friendly airline is of utmost importance. Plan ahead of time with a suitable airline and do not be shy about asking questions as it pertains to dog travel and whether or not he is small enough to be carried on board with you. If the airline makes you feel uncomfortable as you ask questions, choose another carrier.

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How To Walk Two Dogs At The Same Time

Gemma | August 12th, 2006
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Considering that leash training one dog is quite a challenge, is there any way you can ever walk two dogs at the same time? Especially two large breeds? Even those feisty toy breeds can be a monumental challenge to control together!

The answer is… possibly, as long as the dogs get along well

First though, you must leash train each dog individually. Two dogs and two leashes can quickly become a tangled mess, not to mention a trip hazard for the owner trying to walk down the sidewalk. When each dog is singly walking reliably on a loose leash, they can then be trained to walk together.

Walking two dogs can be accomplished in more than one way. You can continue using separate leashes, which allows the dogs more freedom to sniff and move about. Or, you can train them on a coupler, which is two short leads that snap to each collar, with a ring in the middle that attaches the two leads to one leash.

Using a coupler is generally easier for the owner, but some dogs dislike couplers because being connected restricts each dog’s movement. Owners must also ensure that the smallest of the pair doesn’t just get dragged along if the larger dog decides to investigate something along the way.

Introduce a coupler slowly, with initial walks going no more than a few feet. As the dogs become used to the feel of being connected, gradually lengthen your walks.

The same is true when using two leashes (instead of a coupler). Start by walking your dogs for a short distance to make sure they remember their leash manners and understand that the rules still apply to them as a pair. Assuming you have taught some basic commands, such as sit and wait, work on these with the dogs together before stepping out on a walk.

You may find some interesting developments upon walking two dogs at the same time. The you must be talking to that other dog syndrome is common. Even the most obedient dog commonly suffers from this malady.

Then there is the competitive nature that surfaces, causing normally mannered dogs to suddenly start pulling as both dogs strive to reach that interesting smell first. The correct training response is the same as it is for one dog, to stop dead in your tracks as soon as the leash goes taught.

Remember too that this can be a physical challenge – two dogs make up quite a force and not everyone can handle this situation without landing face down on the ground! If you don’t have the strength to thwart two dogs bent on a purpose, it might be safer to stick to one at a time.